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worldwide seeds

Just so that you know you are getting exactly what you paid for, we ensure that all our single seeds are individually labelled and we can include an equal portion of the manufacturers packaging upon request. To provide this safeguard, we insist upon manual packing. As you can imagine, this is very time consuming but we strongly recommend that you do not to trust any company who is not willing to supply part of the original packet. We try to send full packs sealed in their original packaging, although some of our packaging methods do not allow us to do so.

We really recommend that you take a quick look at the left column of our website where our Seed Selector lives. What makes our Seed Selector so special is that you can select many multiple options at the same time, whittling down your selection only to those seeds which interest you the most! A large number of competitors will have selectors of their own but they will not allow you to select multiple options simultaneously.

Whilst it is always a shame to see that The Single Seed Centre have shut down, Seed City is more than happy to welcome those left behind by their absence. Seed City offers a huge choice of over 5,600 cannabis seeds from more than 180 different breeders. We offer guaranteed delivery on all signed for orders, free UK delivery, a price-match promise, the ability to purchase single seeds of every strain we offer and the most in-depth seed categorisation online.

Whether or not you decide to give the team at Seed City a try we hope you enjoy our Seed Selector and if you should choose to use our service we would like to provide you with a 10% coupon code to get you started!

Regular sized packs of weed seeds can vary in size from 6 in a pack to anything up to 10 seeds. As a new cannabis seeds collector you may wonder why you may need to order larger packets of weed seeds. The answer is twofold; firstly seeds are living collectors’ items and as such need to be stored correctly. Having a larger number of a particular specimen acts as an insurance against accidents in storage, especially if you take the precaution to store them in different locations. Storing marijuana seeds need not be difficult however, for optimum longevity they need to be kept consistently cool and free from humidity. The second reason to purchase cannabis seeds in bulk is to handpick the most decorative seeds for your collection. While all our seeds are of the highest quality and sourced from the world’s premier seed banks, the appearance of them will vary. If you opt for a single seed you are left with the luck of the draw in terms of surface variations. If you are an avid seed collector then you may like the option to hand pick the appearance of the marijuana seeds in your collection. One of the most attractive features of many weed seeds is the lighter mottled areas on the surface of many of the variants.

In an age of heightened geopolitical tensions and uncertainty, the Svalbard vault is an unusual and hopeful exercise in international cooperation for the good of humankind. Any organization or country can send seeds to it, and there are no restrictions because of politics or the requirements of diplomacy. Red wooden boxes from North Korea sit alongside black boxes from the U.S. Over on the next aisle, boxes of seeds from Ukraine sit atop seeds from Russia. “The seeds don’t care that there are North Korean seeds and South Korean seeds in the same aisle,” Lainoff says. “They are cold and safe up there, and that’s all that really matters.”

It would be difficult to find a place more remote than the icy wilderness of Svalbard. It is the farthest north you can fly on a commercial airline, and apart from the nearby town of Longyearbyen, it is a vast white expanse of frozen emptiness.

At the end of one of the long rows of seeds inside the vault, a large and symbolic gap has only just been refilled. The black boxes there look like all the others in the vault, but they have had a long journey. The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) is a global agricultural-research organization that had been based in Syria but was forced to flee its headquarters, just outside of Aleppo, because of the civil war. The organization evacuated its international staff in 2012, but some Syrian researchers stayed behind to rescue equipment and even animals.

The seeds lying in the deep freeze of the vault include wild and old varieties, many of which are not in general use anymore. And many don’t exist outside of the seed collections they came from. But the genetic diversity contained in the vault could provide the DNA traits needed to develop new strains for whatever challenges the world or a particular region will face in the future.One of the 200,000 varieties of rice within the vault could have the trait needed to adapt rice to higher temperatures, for example, or to find resistance to a new pest or disease. This is particularly important with the challenges of climate change. “Not too many think about crop diversity as being so fundamentally important, but it is. It is almost as important as water and air,” says Haga. “Seeds generally are the basis for everything. Not only what we eat, but what we wear, nature all about us.”

But as the fighting intensified, they were forced to leave behind their gene bank, one of the world’s most valuable collections of seeds, containing some of the oldest varieties of wheat and barley. ICARDA re-established its headquarters in Morocco and Lebanon, and restarted the gene bank in 2015 using seeds from the Svalbard vault—the first-ever withdrawal there. Woken from their icy slumber, the seeds were planted in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley and in Morocco, and their offspring were carefully collected and processed to return to the vault. In late February, ICARDA returned the varieties of seeds it had taken out. “These seeds have come full circle,” Lainoff explains.

Millions of these tiny brown specks, from more than 930,000 varieties of food crops, are stored in the Global Seed Vault on Spitsbergen, part of Norway’s Svalbard archipelago. It is essentially a huge safety deposit box, holding the world’s largest collection of agricultural biodiversity. “Inside this building is 13,000 years of agricultural history,” says Brian Lainoff, lead partnerships coordinator of the Crop Trust, which manages the vault, as he hauls open the huge steel door leading inside the mountain.

Deep in the bowels of an icy mountain on an island above the Arctic Circle between Norway and the North Pole lies a resource of vital importance for the future of human­kind. It’s not coal, oil or precious minerals, but seeds.