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sprout in pot

Autoflowering strains require some preparation, as they will grow quickly and start to flower whether or not you’re ready for them.

Autoflowers can be started in early spring and will flower during the longest days of summer, taking advantage of high quality light to get bigger yields. Or, if you get a late start in the growing season, you can start autoflowers in May or June and harvest in the fall.

Training plants

If growing outside, some growers prefer to germinate seeds inside because they are delicate in the beginning stages of growth. Indoors, you can give weed seedlings supplemental light to help them along, and then transplant them outside when big enough.

A lot of classic weed strains that have been around for a while come in feminized form. Some popular fem seeds are:

After completing these steps, it’s time to wait. Check the paper towels once a day to make sure they’re still saturated, and if they are losing moisture, apply more water to keep the seeds happy.

We also had trouble rooting clones in Rockwool. Rockwool cubes just don’t hold enough air to get plenty of oxygen to the roots, and they tend to hold onto a lot of water and get waterlogged easily. Since Rockwool can hold a lot of water, it’s prone to “drowning” seeds

When in doubt, get a bigger final container size as opposed to a smaller one. Plants that get rootbound from being in a too-small container will grow more slowly and be prone to problems. It’s not good to transfer plants during the flowering/budding stage, so you want to have your cannabis plants in their final container at least 2 weeks before the beginning of flowering/budding. How do I get my cannabis plants to start flowering?

Germination Method 3: Germination Station

8-10+ gallon container

Another method to germinate marijuana seeds is to soak them overnight in slightly warm water, usually done in a glass drinking cup.

Next, the cannabis plant will start making 5-finger leaves

Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera) resemble baby cabbages, all lined up in neat rows on the tall stalks. These plants naturally grow vertically without support, making them a suitable addition to a space-saving container garden. Brussels sprouts grow best in cool weather, and they may fail to form sprouts if it’s too hot. They take about 90 days to produce sprouts, so gardeners often plant them in early summer for a fall crop or in early spring so they can mature before the heat of summer.

Plant one brussels sprout seedling in the pot, setting it at the same depth it was growing at in its previous container. Place the pot in a location that receives full, all-day sunlight immediately after planting.

Things You Will Need

14-14-14 slow-release fertilizer

Fill a 12-inch diameter, 12-inch deep pot with potting soil. Mix 1 1/2 tablespoons of 14-14-14 slow-release fertilizer into the potting mix. Water the soil until the excess moisture begins to drain from the bottom of the pot.

Twist the brusssels sprouts from the main stalk when they reach their mature size of 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Harvest from the bottom of the stalk and work up as the sprouts mature. Lower sprouts mature earlier than the top ones.