Marijuana Seeds Arizona

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Buy Cannabis Seeds Online

Get high quality cannabis seeds in Ohio, cannabis cup winner Mosca Seeds delivers the finest weed seeds online The Smart and Safe Arizona Act, a recreational cannabis proposition likely to be on November’s ballot, would legalize growing marijuana at home. But finding quality seeds still won't be as easy as a trip to Home Depot. Michael Moss wants to help other patients with his mail-order cannabis seed business. He says a legal loophole allows it.

ARIZONA

You can get high-quality cannabis seeds from Mosca to enjoy the many natural wonders in the great state of Arizona, the 48th state admitted to the union in 1912. The name Arizona was name derived from the Aztec Indian word “arizuma” which means “silver-bearing,” although is also known as the “Copper State” with an abundant supply of this mineral. Arizona is also known as The Grand Canyon State, which stretches 277 miles with walls descending over a mile to the floor of the canyon where the Colorado River runs.

Cannabis Seeds in Arizona

You can get really high on the 3,928 mountain peaks and summits with 26 peaks over 10,000 feet, and you can get quality cannabis seeds in Arizona from Mosca Seeds to double the pleasure. Marijuana seeds are available in the state’s capital of Phoenix, the 5th largest state in America. The red rocks of Sedona, abundant natural beauty, and Native American culture make Arizona a great place to live or visit, and with legalized adult use marijuana since election day 2020, it is also a green-friendly state.

Medical Marijuana Legal in Arizona

Arizona legalized medical marijuana in 1996 for seriously or terminally ill patients to be prescribed by a doctor but was overturned due to the terminology of “prescribe” that conflicted with federal law. Medical Marijuana was attempted to pass in AZ again in 2002 but did not earn enough votes. It was not until 2010 that Arizona voters passed the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act with a narrow margin of over 50% in Proposition 203. According to an article published on Tuscon.com in the fall of 2021, more than 295,000 people in AZ participate in the medical marijuana program, up 27% from 2019 figures.

The Arizona medical marijuana program allows possession of up to 2.5 ounces with a physician’s written certification. One retail, medical dispensary is allowed for every 10 registered pharmacy locations with a medical marijuana delivery service for patients located far from the closest dispensary. Arizona medical marijuana patients can grow up to 12 plants in their residence in a locked, closed facility if located more than 25 miles from a state-licensed dispensary.

Recreational Marijuana Laws In Arizona

On election day 2020, Arizona voters passed Proposition 207 with just over 60% of votes and legalized adult-use, recreational cannabis with the “Smart and Safe Arizona Act”. With legal recreational weed, adults can now legally possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana, of which 5 grams can be concentrate such as oil or wax, for use in a vape pen. If adults are found in possession of more than 1 ounce but less than 2.5 ounces, they may incur a civil penalty of not more than $100.

It is still illegal to use recreational marijuana in public places while operating a vehicle or near a school. Additionally, police cannot perform a warrantless search if they smell marijuana, and certain marijuana convictions can be expunged under the new law. Petitions for expungement were able to be filed beginning July 12, 2021, and only apply to certain charges, convictions, adjudications, and arrests.

Marijuana Growing Laws In Arizona

With the nice hot climate of typically low humidity and sunny skies at least 300 days a year, Arizona is an ideal location to grow your own weed, and you can get high-quality cannabis seeds in Arizona from Mosca Seeds. Adults are allowed to cultivate up to six plants with no penalty, growing more than six plants could result in a felony charge. With water in short supply in AZ, it might even be a good idea to grow hydroponically indoors with a grow system that recirculates water and nutrients.

Remember that quality plants start with quality pot seeds, and you can choose from a variety of seed types such as regular seeds, feminized or autoflowers from Mosca in potent Indicas or satisfying Sativa blends.

Mosca offers quality, award-winning cannabis seeds online for growing medical or recreational marijuana in Arizona. With more than 15 years of experience in cannabis seed genetics and several cannabis cup wins, Mosca is your one-stop for the best weed seeds online. Check out the seed bank to get Mosca quality cannabis seeds in Arizona.

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A Proposed Law Would Let Arizonans Grow Pot, but Where Will Seeds Come From?

The Smart and Safe Arizona Act, a recreational cannabis proposition likely to be on November’s ballot, would legalize the home-grow of up to six plants per person, with a maximum total of 12 plants per household. Home cultivators could also give away an ounce of marijuana or up to six plants (including seeds) to another legal adult.

Tim Sultan, who worked with the Arizona Dispensaries Association to draft the proposition and now represents the Marijuana Industry Trade Association, confirmed that getting the seeds to start a grow may prove tricky.

“Anybody selling seeds in Arizona without a dispensary license is not authorized,” he said. “Patients, caregivers, whoever … we don’t know what we’re supposed to do.”

Medical marijuana dispensaries aren’t selling them today, and ADA board member Moe Asnani, iLava co-founder and partner at The Downtown & D2 Dispensaries in Tucson, has an answer as to why.

“I can simply point you to the statute that was passed in [Prop 203] — the Medical Marijuana Act,” Asnani said. “If you look at the definition of usable marijuana in the statute, it actually excludes seeds from usable marijuana. And we’re not allowed to dispense anything that’s not usable marijuana … Smart and Safe will change that.”

This leaves no legal way to buy seeds if voters approve Smart and Safe — until or unless retail shops start selling them.

Yet the dispensaries started somehow. And some patients and caregivers have been growing cannabis for years. These days, local and online black markets for seeds exist for those who decide to risk it. Some are quite brazen.

Online companies, called seed banks, offer to ship seeds anywhere in the country. Cannabis seeds are sold as hemp seeds to take advantage of legal loopholes. Since hemp cannot legally contain more than 0.3 percent of THC, the sellers just claim they’re hemp seeds. No one’s the wiser until they sprout.

To be clear, hemp is now legal in some states, including Arizona, for registered farmers. However, these laws didn’t legalize personal hemp grows or, except for those farmers, possession of hemp seeds.

Most Arizona patients aren’t licensed to cultivate under current law, which requires living outside a 25-mile radius from an operating dispensary. There are 2,613 qualifying patients and designated caregivers authorized to cultivate cannabis in Arizona, state records indicate.

This all raises the question of how Arizona’s industry started. Seeds couldn’t be legally imported nor owned, so immaculate conception may be the best term to describe how Arizona’s dispensaries began cultivating. It seems likely that the recreational market will follow suit.

The ability to grow pot at home would be a notable change from the current legal climate.

But will dispensaries or caregivers sell seeds and live plants?

In Colorado, which approved recreational cannabis in 2012, some shops sell seeds and plant clones. Under that state’s law, according to the Denver Clone Store’s website, “seeds are legally considered to be immature plants, so the typical limit on seeds, clones, or a combination of both is 6, unless you have a medical recommendation for more. ”

The Smart and Safe Arizona Act’s definition of “marijuana” includes seeds, and it doesn’t describe any limit other than the one-ounce possession limit.

According to Asnani, in Arizona, selling seeds would be the choice of each individual dispensary, but seeds, clones, and grow classes may become commonplace if voters approve the proposition.

“People need to try to grow themselves. Some of them may be really successful at it, and some of them won’t,” he said. “I think that’s something where they need to have the right to try it out.”

KEEP PHOENIX NEW TIMES FREE. Since we started Phoenix New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Phoenix, and we’d like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it’s more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our “I Support” program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.

Pipe Dream? Arizona Man Believes Legal Loophole Lets Him Sell Pot Seeds

Michael Moss was a welder until degenerative disc disease forced him into an early retirement. In 2011, he moved to Arizona for the climate, landing in the small Navajo County city of Show Low.

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What followed was a series of surgeries that sandwiched the broken vertebrae in the middle of his spine between 24 screws in his neck and six lag bolts in his lower back.

When the heavy, opioid-based painkillers doctors prescribed him left him emaciated and like a “zombie,” he turned to medical marijuana. But the high-potency medicine he needed cost as much as $400 a week. That was unaffordable on disability pay, so he started growing his own.

After a bad experience buying seeds, Moss decided to start selling them himself to offer a better alternative. These days, the 48-year-old entrepreneur is bringing in an estimated $1,000 a month by selling seeds openly on the internet.

“I’m just trying to help people. No one was there to help me,” Moss told Phoenix New Times.

The business is not illegal because the seeds are marketed as “souvenirs,” he said, according to advice he received from an attorney with a prepaid legal service.

However, postal authorities say there is no such loophole, and that Moss could face serious repercussions.

The Business

Moss is one of the few U.S.-based cannabis seed vendors and offers what he said is the largest seed collection in Arizona. He has 100 different strains he sells through his website and hopes to have added an additional 100 by next year. Among the payment options accepted: Venmo, Facebook Pay, a Walmart wire transfer and mailed checks. Most of his earnings go back into the business, he said.

While a growing number of states, including Arizona, have legalized recreational or medical marijuana, transporting marijuana products across state borders is a federal offense. Members of Arizona’s cannabis industry joke that the seeds to start state-approved grow ops blew across the border from California in the wind.

Moss openly admits to mailing seeds across state borders. He buys seeds from growers in Washington, California, Oklahoma, and Michigan. People in Oklahoma made up his biggest customer base for a while. While there are “seed banks” in Europe, purchasers carry the risk of having their seeds intercepted by customs officials if not properly disguised. Seeds shipped within the United States don’t have that problem.

After consulting with lawyers at LegalShield, a prepaid legal insurance service, Moss said he believes what he is doing is legal as long as the seeds are sold as souvenirs or collectors items to people over the age of 21. His website and pop-up stores carry disclaimers saying as much.

“Once they leave me, it’s up to [buyers] to abide by their state laws,” Moss said, acknowledging that he will help offer general advice about cultivating cannabis to anyone who calls.

Not only is Moss operating in the open, but his Venmo feed is public, showing the names of purchasers and their order numbers. Discretion isn’t in the business plan: He used some of his savings to get a car decorated with weed decals and the name of his business, MossMSeeds. Soon, he’s going to add neon lighting to the ride and a smoke machine. He gave an interview to the White Mountain Independent for an article about his business last month, and Moss comes to the Valley on weekends for events and podcast interviews.

“I’m a handicapped, disabled guy trying to keep myself well and it’s just a plant,” he said. “The wheelchair is coming. That’s why I’m trying to make a mark.”

Legal Issues

Plant or not, federal authorities don’t take kindly to distributing pot seeds in the mail.

Liz Davis, a spokesperson for the Phoenix division of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, said that while marijuana is legal in some states, it’s federally illegal under the Controlled Substances Act and cannabis seeds are therefore illegal to mail. The inspection service aggressively pursues people who traffic in all forms of illegal narcotics, she said.

“Honestly, as Postal Inspectors, we don’t really care what someone purports to be selling. If it is illegal to mail, it is illegal to mail,” Davis wrote in an email. “Our mission as inspectors is to ensure the mail is safe for our employees and our customers. Whether stated as a souvenir or having an agricultural purpose, it is still a controlled substance and therefore nonmailable. USPS Letter Carriers have been killed delivering parcels containing controlled substances. If it is a nonmailable item, we do not want it in the mail.”

Davis added that if New Times shared Moss’ name and contact information, they would investigate further. New Times declined her offer. But Moss isn’t hiding.

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Phoenix cannabis attorney Tom Dean said Moss is facing serious legal jeopardy.

“My advice to him is not to do it,” said Dean, a former legal director for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) who has practiced cannabis law for over 20 years. Even if someone has a “clever” defense, most don’t get a chance to use it because that would require going to trial and facing mandatory prison time if it doesn’t work. Instead, they take a plea deal. In this case, “there’s no grey area,” Dean said.

When New Times asked Moss about what Dean said, he cited a different website selling seeds that claims marijuana seeds are legal in Arizona since they don’t contain THC or CBD. He also pointed out that he had obtained a license from the state to sell agricultural seeds at his lawyer’s advice.

That’s no good, according to Dean. For one, un-sterilized seeds are explicitly considered marijuana for the purposes of Arizona and federal law, meaning that selling them within Arizona requires a license. Even if selling seeds was legal in Arizona, transporting them between states and in the mail is a federal offense.

“The seed dealer’s license doesn’t mean he can sell illegal drugs,” Dean said.

It’s unclear how much emphasis federal or state authorities may put on cracking down on people like Moss, Dean said. But based on how they’ve handled medical marijuana, local law enforcement may face pressure from the cannabis industry to crack down on unlicensed growers and avoid a free-for-all. People who buy from Moss are unlikely to face prosecution, but it’s not out of the question.

“Good intentions are not a defense. Being mistaken is not a defense. And law enforcement could care less about that kind of thing,” he said.

Disclaimer

While Moss is small-time compared to some other online seed vendors, the federal government has cracked down hard on similar businesses in the past.

In 2005, Western District of Washington U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan, now mayor of Seattle, had the head of the British Columbia Marijuana Party extradited to the United States on charges of selling marijuana seeds to Americans through the mail. Marc Emery claimed to be making $3 million a year from the sales and was eventually sentenced to five years in prison.

David Williams, the general counsel for the law firm Davis Miles McGuire Gardner, PLLC, which provided Moss his advice through LegalShield, said he could not comment or acknowledge whether Moss was a client of the firm due to attorney-client confidentially. In an email sent to Moss, and shared with New Times, he said they provided him limited advice but do not comment on their work to the media.

Despite Dean’s warning, Moss said on Wednesday he plans to continue his business based on the advice he says he got from the LegalShield attorney and what he’s read online.

“It is kind of concerning, but at the same time I’m going to keep doing what I got to do,” he said. “If they want to pick on a disabled guy over a plant … I’m a disabled guy who doesn’t want to be on pain meds and this is what helps me.”

“I bet he never Googled it,” he added of Dean.

In an interview the next day, Moss told New Times he had Googled local cannabis attorneys, calling as many as he could. He spoke to one on Thursday morning who told him he was at some risk but that the lawyer’s “gut feeling” was that authorities wouldn’t come after him. That made Moss feel better. At the attorney’s recommendation, he’s going to start including the disclaimer from his website in each package.

“I feel a lot safer at this point,” Moss said.

KEEP PHOENIX NEW TIMES FREE. Since we started Phoenix New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Phoenix, and we’d like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it’s more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our “I Support” program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.

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