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how to crack cannabis seeds

I’m planning on using the damp towel method. Is there a specific way to do this? I know to just get 2 towels and out them in between, but I read somewhere that it should be around 80 degrees or so. Is that necessary? Let me know. Thanks.

I’m planning on using the damp towel method. Is there a specific way to do this? I know to just get 2 towels and out them in between, but I read somewhere that it should be around 80 degrees or so. Is that necessary? Let me know. Thanks.

Well-Known Member

This method works very well for me. I don’t even heat the paper towel up, and they work just fine. Soil isn’t warm generally so they do fine. I can’t say forsure, but if people have seeds that don’t germinate this way, it’s probably the seeds and not the method of germination – unless they messed up and let the paper towel dry up.

Start with making a layer of cotton wool moist but not dripping wet, so that the excess water won’t suffocate the seeds. Then place your seeds on top, cover them with another layer (also moist), and put everything in a dark place.

The perfect pH for cannabis seed germination is between 5.5-6.0.

Easy-To-Grow Cannabis Strains

If you’re wondering how to germinate marijuana seeds for hydroponics, peat pellets, unlike other methods from this article, aren’t suitable for hydroponic setups. However, the rest of the techniques we’ll be discussing can be used for both soil and soilless media.

The difficulty with germinating cannabis seeds in cotton wool is that the emerging roots may get entangled in it. For this reason, it’s better to use cotton pads in which cotton is more compacted and there is less fiber sticking out.

Even though many growers prefer using rockwool for germination of their cannabis seeds, this method has quite a few drawbacks. First of all, the pH of new rockwool is not suited for cannabis seeds. It’s far too high and needs to be lowered before use. That’s why rockwool requires soaking overnight in pH-ed water and properly rinsed afterward. The second drawback of using rockwool for germination is that it’s a synthetic material that’s bad for both your health and the environment. When working with rockwool, it’s advised to use gloves and protective masks, because little pieces of the material can easily get into your mouth, eyes, and even end up in your lungs. Lastly, germination rates for seeds placed in rockwool cubes aren’t that great either – you can wait for your seeds to pop for weeks without any result.