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cannabis seeds texas law

San Antonio NORML
1126 W. Mulberry
San Antonio, TX 78201
Phone: 210-837-1133
Contact: Heather Brockus
Email: [email protected]

Texas NORML, Inc.
3517 Bar West Blvd. PMB #205
Austin, TX 78731
Phone: (512) 585-3846
Contact: Josh Schimberg
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.myspace.com/texasnorml

** Unless previous conviction of paraphernalia sale or possession (if previous conviction, 90 days to 1 year). Paraphernalia sale to a minor at least 3 years younger than actor- State Jail Felony = 180 days-2 years; $10,000

Any sale to a minor is punishable by 2 – 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. Sale within 1,000 feet of a school or within 300 feet of a youth center, public pool or video arcade increases the penalty classification to the next highest level.

Repeat Misdemeanor Offenses:

Possession of two ounces or less of marijuana is punishable by up to 180 days in jail and a fine up to $2,000. Possession of greater than two ounces is punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine up to $4,000. For greater than four ounces the penalty increases to 180 days – two years in jail and a fine up to $10,000. Possession of greater than five pounds carries a penalty of 2 – 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. For greater than 50 pounds the penalties increase to 2 – 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. For any amount greater than 2,000 pounds the penalty is 5 – 99 years and a fine up to $50,000.

* With no prior felony convictions, if convicted of possession of less than one pound of marijuana a judge must impose a sentence of probation with mandatory drug treatment. If no treatment center exists within the jurisdiction, the judge may waive the treatment requirement. They judge can also waive all fines.

Fortunately, at least for them, the governor has now deviated from his tough anti-cannabis stance.

So far so simple, but this is the USA! In fact, the resulting change has led to the dropping of hundreds of marijuana possession cases as the prosecutors claim they do not have the resources to detect the exact amount of THC found in the seized substances. As a result, Texan marijuana prosecutions have dropped by around 50%.

Texas is the second-largest state in the USA both in size and in terms of the general population. Sharing a border with Mexico, historically, the Lone Star State is also one of the most conservative areas of the country and – well – is not somewhere you want to get caught in possession of or growing the smallest amounts of marijuana without permission. Read our guide to find out all you need to know about the law surrounding growing weed in Texas.

Recreational

Cannabis is illegal in Texas and has been since 1931. However, there is currently some confusion. In 2019, the Texan federal government decided that hemp could be legalized, although marijuana could not, even though they grow from the same plant. Basically, marijuana is the part that contains THC – still illegal – while hemp contains cannabinoids or CBD, which are popularly used for medicinal purposes. In 2019, hemp was legalized in Texas when the state legislature passed HB 1325. The law came into effect on June 10, 2019, making cannabis with less than 0.3% legal hemp as THC, while anything more important is considered marijuana.

In October 2014, Harris County Attorney Devon Anderson announced the First Chance Intervention Program, under which people with two ounces of cannabis or less could be offered a 90-day community service diversion program or drug education, instead of criminal prosecution and imprisonment. As of January 2016, the program was expanded to be mandatory for all law enforcement in the county.

Cannabis oil has been legal since June 1, 2015, when Governor Greg Abbott signed the Texas Compassionate Use Act, which permits the use of low THC CBD oil to treat epilepsy in Texas. Abbott’s caveats his support: “I remain convinced that Texas should not legalize marijuana, it should only open the door to conventional marijuana for medicinal use. This followed a House of 96-34 vote on SB339.

Yes, somewhat surprisingly considering the rest of the legislation surrounding cannabis, the good news is that you won’t be breaking any laws. Marijuana seeds in Texas are legal to buy and possess. This is because marijuana seeds simply do not contain sufficient levels of psychoactive THC to be thought of as drugs in their own right. As is the case with the majority of American citizens, Texans are therefore allowed to buy and own marijuana seeds for personal reasons, such as collection