Posted on

cannabis sativa seed oil drug test

According to the research studies available, the answer to this is question is a resounding NO! Regular consumption or use of commercially made hemp foods (such as seeds, cooking oil, cereals, milk, granola) or hemp products (lotions, shampoos, lip balms, etc.) will not show a positive result for THC on a drug test.

Hemp-based foods and hemp body products commercially produced and sold in the United States are not legally allowed to contain the potentially psychoactive cannabinoid known as THC (Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol). If a laboratory-tested hemp product did happen to contain trace amounts of this compound, it would be in such small quantities that it would likely require exorbitant amounts of ingestion or use for it to even remotely begin to show up in the smallest amount on a drug test.

However, with that said, consuming non-commercially produced hemp foods, hemp-based oils, or using homemade hemp-based products may have risks to test positive. Non-federally regulated foods and products, like those purchased from a dispensary, farmer’s market, or even products bought online, do not necessarily follow any sort of federal food safety guidelines or food and drug administration regulations. When purchasing these types of hemp products, make sure you use caution and ask questions about how they were made and whether they were tested before being packaged.

“Will eating hemp foods show up positive for THC on a drug test?”

As a healthcare professional, a common question that I receive when talking to patients and clients who are interested in incorporating the use of hemp products or hemp foods into their daily routine is:

Still, generally speaking, hemp-based food and products (federally regulated ones, anyway) shouldn’t show a positive result for THC on a drug test, so keep enjoying your hemp snacks!

Now that we’ve defined hemp oil, we return to our original question: Does hemp oil show up on a drug test—in particular, a Department of Transportation (DOT) drug test? The DOT does not allow the use of cannabis with over 0.3% THC. However, hemp oil generally contains under 0.3% THC, and it doesn’t affect a person unless taken in extreme amounts, making its use acceptable in the eyes of the DOT. Unless taken in extreme quantities, hemp oil—including CBD oil and hemp seed oil—does not usually show up on drug tests. This is because drug tests test for THC, the active ingredient in marijuana; the level of THC in hemp oil is much lower than in marijuana—generally too low to be detected.

It’s important to keep in mind, however, that CBD manufacturers cannot always guarantee their products’ THC levels are below 0.3%. Thus, if the hemp oil you’re using contains any THC, there’s always a slight chance you’ll test positive for marijuana. Use hemp oil at your own discretion, and if you’re concerned about testing positive, consider taking a non-DOT drug test to confirm that your THC levels aren’t too high.

Hemp oil is made from the hemp plant, a species of cannabis. There are two main varieties of hemp oil: hemp seed oil and cannabidiol (CBD oil). Hemp seed oil is made from the seeds of the hemp plant and contains little to no tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and no active CBD. Hemp seed oil is usually used for nutritional purposes, as it contains vitamins, minerals, and essential fatty acids. CBD oil differs from hemp seed oil, but the two terms are often used interchangeably. CBD oil is made from the stalks, leaves, and flowers of the hemp plant. It contains a higher percentage of CBD than hemp seed oil does, and it can be used for medical and recreational purposes.

What Is Hemp Oil?

If you’re a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) driver, you probably already know that the use of certain drugs, including marijuana, will disqualify you from driving a commercial vehicle. But what about oils made from cannabis, such as hemp oil and CBD oil? Does hemp oil show up on a drug test? Read on to learn more.

As a CDL driver, you must always be careful to avoid substances the DOT doesn’t allow because the consequences of a violation are serious. Be prepared for a random DOT drug and alcohol test whenever you’re on duty. And remember, if you need help managing your DOT random drug and alcohol testing compliance, Labworks USA’s drug and alcohol testing consortium is always happy to help.

For instance, if someone who had direct contact with marijuana then touched your hair, you could feasibly receive a false positive on a drug screening that tests your hair.

The primary difference between hemp and marijuana is that hemp is nearly void of THC. In fact, a cannabis strain must contain less than .3 percent THC to be classified as hemp. This is the reason hemp can be legally sold as various products.

There are several techniques for extracting CBD oil from the cannabis plant. The extraction method determines whether the active CBD compound gets processed as a “full spectrum oil” or an “isolate.” A CBD isolate is a pure compound with no other active compounds or cannabinoids at all. A full spectrum oil contains other active plant compounds in addition to the CBD such as CBN (cannabinol) and cannabis terpenes (the part of the plant that gives the plant its aroma), and more.

5. CBD Oil Breaks Down in The Digestive System

What are the odds that CBD oil users will test positive when subjected to illicit drug screenings, and what can be done to prevent it?

Inadvertent exposure to marijuana (via secondhand smoke) is unlikely to be enough for a person to get a positive drug test result, but it is possible. Being in a room with heavy pot smokers for several hours may cause the inhalation of enough THC containing smoke to result in a positive test.  

Drug tests look for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the element in marijuana that causes a high. CBD oils can have trace amounts of THC even if they're labeled “THC-free.” The FDA does not regulate these products, and mislabeling is common.

Cannabis is the umbrella term describing hemp and marijuana plants—two different varieties of the cannabis genus. Both marijuana and hemp can be described as cannabis plants; however, it is important to note that they are still two separate plants.