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cannabis sativa l seeds

Hemp is a multi-purpose, multi-beneficial ingredient made from the pressed flowers, leaves, stalks and seeds of the Cannabis Sativa plant. Often cultivated for use in everything from agriculture, to food and beauty; hemp is most commonly known for its fibrous qualities and is frequently used in the production of clothing, textiles, and paper. Hemp oil and seeds also find their way into many foods as they are a rich source of omega fatty acids and essential nutrients.

What does Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil do for the skin?

As a rich source of vitamin E, a powerful natural preservative and antioxidant, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil helps strengthen the skin’s natural barrier so that valuable moisture remains locked-in and skin is protected against environmental stress factors.

Understanding the differences between cannabis, hemp, and marijuana can be confusing because marijuana and hemp come from the same plant, Cannabis Sativa. The distinction is the variety of the plant. In the case of cannabis, the varieties differ in the amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that they contain. THC is the psychoactive constituent responsible for the high that cannabis gives. Hemp generally contains very little THC, so it has absolutely no psychoactive effects.

What are the benefits of Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil?

Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre contribtuion no. 2098

Characteristics of oil extracted from hempseeds subjected to microwave treatments were evaluated. Microwave treatment improved oil yield, increased carotenoid and other pigment contents and decreased p-anisidine value without significant changes in other properties. Hempseed oil showed absorbance in the UV-B and UV-C ranges with potential for use as a broad spectrum UV protectant. β-Tocopherol concentrations increased, while the major tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and fatty acid composition of the oil were unaffected by microwave treatment of hempseed. Hempseed oil showed high kinetic stability during heating and cooling, as characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Microwave treatment shifted the melting range of oils to lower temperatures and increased oxidation temperatures, suggesting increased protective effect upon heating.

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Citing articles

How does regulation work outside the EU?
In the USA, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not prohibit or restrict the use of cannabis or cannabis-derived ingredients in cosmetics, and considers the possibility that a product containing these substances can have both a cosmetic and a drug use (for instance, creams to treat dermatitis or acne). Unlike in the USA, however, no therapeutic or medical claim should be asserted for cosmetics in Europe. This applies as well to products containing permitted cosmetic raw materials extracted from Cannabis sativa.

In this context, Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009 for cosmetics bans the use of CBD derived from resin, tinctures and extracts of Cannabis, as well as cannabinoids, resin and various extracts (e.g. Cannabis Sativa flower extract, Cannabis Sativa flower/leaf/stem extract) from cosmetic use (Annex II). Synthetically produced CBD is acceptable for end use.

How is hemp used in cosmetics and what are its properties?
There are several types of extract from hemp used in cosmetics:

To this date, cosmetic regulatory compliance of CBD as an ingredient itself relies on the part of the plant from which it is extracted. For instance, seeds when not accompanied by tops are acceptable, although these do not contain CBD, whereas CBD prepared from Cannabis extracts or tinctures from flower/fruiting tops where the resin has not been separated, as well as the separated resin, are not allowed for use. Indeed, the UN 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs defines controlled cannabis as “the flowering or fruiting tops of the cannabis plant”, but does not consider Cannabis sativa seeds or leaves as controlled substances (as long as they are not accompanied by the tops).

Specific European and national legislation as well as international conventions apply to establish which type of extracts and derivates of the Cannabis sativa L. plant may be used in products, including food and cosmetics. Keep reading to find out more about hemp, an incresingly popular ingredient in cosmetics, and the differences in the extracts and derivates of the Cannabis sativa L. plant.

How about detectable THC levels in cosmetics?
Under Regulation (EU) No. 1308/2013, Cannabis sativa L. is considered as an agricultural product and as an “industrial plant” that may be grown legally as long as their THC content does not exceed 0.2%. However, for cosmetics, national legislations from EU Member States on controlled substances may apply. For instance, in France no THC is allowed, while in Luxembourg a THC concentration up to 0.3% is permitted.

Marijuana and CBD are not the same even if they both come from the same plant. CBD is a single, isolated compound in the cannabis plant, while marijuana contains many naturally occurring compounds, including THC and CBD. Hemp seed oil, extracted from the seeds of Cannabis sativa L., Cannabaceae, has next to no THC or CBD.