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best cannabis seed starting soil

If you’re growing without additional nutrients, your soil needs to contain organic substances such as humus, compost, worm castings, guano, etc. Microorganisms in the soil will turn these substances into nutrients for your plants to access on demand.

When growing autoflowers, stay away from heavily fertilised soils and certain amendments like bat guano, as these will be too hot and overload your plants with nutrients. The same is true for cannabis seedlings, which do not like high levels of nutrients.

COCO COIR

Growing cannabis in soil is a great way to crop fat, flavoursome buds. Moreover, soil is one of the most forgiving substrates. What are the best soils for growing cannabis? What do you need to know if you want to make your own soil? Our guide answers these questions and more!

Perlite is the most widely used soil amendment. Perlite consists of very light, bright-white rocks that greatly improve the drainage and airiness of the soil. Perlite also has decent water retention. To amend your soil with it, add 10–15% of perlite. You can add more, but then your soil may become too light and nutrients may leach out. Good-quality commercial soils often come with added perlite.

On the other hand, there may come a time when you want to make your own soil. After all, why spend good money on soil if your homemade version is even better? Here is a recipe for a basic homemade cannabis soil.

Whenever you start feeding your plants, we recommend giving them half the recommended dose of fertiliser during the first week of feeding. This gives the plants time to adjust to their new diet.

Cannabis seedlings like warm, humid conditions. Unfortunately, pests and diseases also love these conditions. Keeping things extra clean and growing your seedlings in a propagator can help prevent an infestation.

• Aeration

HOW TO AVOID NUTRIENT PROBLEMS

Similarly, under-potting can be just as detrimental to your plants. Plants that are root-bound take up water very quickly, encouraging you to water them more regularly than necessary, leading to overwatering.

Cannabis plants constantly lose moisture through their leaves in a process known as transpiration (which plays an essential role in a plant’s ability to transport water from its roots up through its stem). Hence, it’s super important they always have access to water from their soil. When a plant goes too long without water, a lot of its vital functions start to slow down. Any roots that dry out completely die off, stunting the plant’s growth or possibly killing it all together (if its root system is underdeveloped).

Growers usually run into nutrient burn when they feed their seedlings too early or when they transition into the vegetative phase (either because they transplant their seedlings into hot soil or they start feeding with a fertiliser that’s too strong). The first signs of nutrient burn are dark green leaves with burnt tips. Left untreated, nutrient burn also causes leaves to curl upwards.

While it’s not as common as overwatering, underwatering is definitely an issue for some beginner growers (especially those that have been warned about overwatering their plants).

The flowering mix is the same except that i add High Phosphorus Guano, in my case, Jamaican.

2 parts Sunshine #4
1 part Ocean Forest (Happy Frog works great too)
Mycorrhizal fungi inoculant
Earthworm castings.
Dried Kelp
Jamaican Bat Poop (In the flowering mix)

I use sunshine #4 (Soilless mix) for starting, and i cut my Ocean Forest with Sunshine #4 for vegging.

That mix lightens up the Ocean Forest, and improves drainage because of all the perlite in Sunshine #4. The Myco inoculant is already in Happy Frog, but it’s not in Ocean Forest, so i add it. The Jamaican Bat Guano increases the phosphorus, because i’ve always thought that Ocean Forest just didn’t have enough Phos to finish up the buds. You’ll still need the occasional Micro-nutrient.